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Distinct microbiome-neuroimmune signatures correlate with functional abdominal pain in children with autism spectrum disorder

TitleDistinct microbiome-neuroimmune signatures correlate with functional abdominal pain in children with autism spectrum disorder
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsLuna, RAnn, Oezguen, N, Balderas, M, Venkatachalam, A, Runge, JK, Versalovic, J, Veenstra-VanderWeele, J, Anderson, GM, Savidge, T, Williams, K
JournalCellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Volume3
Pagination218–230
Summary

Lead Author
Ruth Luna

Study Aims and Objectives
This study had two main objectives. The first was to determine if type of bacteria in the gut of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) with altered stool patterns and abdominal pain differ from neurotypically developing peers with and without the same gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. The second was to determine if any changes in bacteria are associated with changes in the type of small proteins that communicate between the gut and brain.

Methods - Sample, Procedure, Study Measures, Analysis This study looked at samples of blood and intestinal tissue that were taken during colonoscopies of boys and girls aged 3 to 18. The type of bacteria and various small proteins that play a role in communication between the gut and brain were compared between children with ASD and neurotypically developing children.

Results – Main Finding(s) The type of bacteria differed between children with ASD and neurotypically developing children. Further differences in the type of bacteria were seen between children with ASD who were experiencing abdominal pain and neurotypical children who reported abdominal pain. The differences in bacteria associated with abdominal pain in children with ASD were also associated with differences in the type of small proteins that play a role in communications between the gastrointestinal, immune, and nervous system.

Conclusion – Summary Statements
A distinct profile in the types of bacteria and signaling molecules was seen in ASD children with GI symptoms of abdominal pain and altered stool patterns as compared to neurotypically developing children with and without the same GI symptoms.

PubMed ID28275689